Previous Next

Pedestrian Safety

Always use crosswalks. Slow down and watch for pedestrians.

  • There were 2,766 pedestrian-involved crashes in Maryland, resulting in 2,515 injuries and 111 fatalities.
  • There are 2,720 pedestrian-involved crashes in Maryland each year, resulting in 2,329 pedestrians injured and 105 pedestrians killed.
  • Nearly 70 percent of all pedestrian fatalities are male.
  • Over 40 percent of the pedestrians killed in Maryland are over 50 years old.
  • More than two thirds of pedestrians killed in crashes are reported as being on the roadway but not in a crosswalk.
  • Approximately 21 percent of pedestrians killed have a BAC of .08 or above.
  • Pedestrian crashes account for 3 percent of Maryland’s overall crashes, but account for 21 percent of statewide fatalities.
  • Pedestrians between the ages of 10 and 29 accounted for nearly 40 percent of those struck by vehicles; however, older pedestrians (ages 45–59) comprised over 30 percent of those involved in fatal crashes.


Pedestrians ALWAYS lose when involved in a crash.


Here’s what you can do:

  • Drivers need to slow down, expect and watch for pedestrians on the road and yield to pedestrians in crosswalks and when turning.
  • Pedestrians need to make smart decisions; be seen (wear bright-colored clothing), cross when it is safe (use crosswalks and cross at intersections) and yield to oncoming traffic.
  • Be extra alert at night, especially when it is dark and in bad weather.
  • Avoid distractions and pay attention when walking or driving – your life depends on it!

For more information on Maryland’s pedestrian safety laws and other resources click here

*Crash data are derived from the State Highway Administration, based on reports submitted and processed by the Maryland State Police Central Records Division (MSP CRD) and through the Automated Crash Reporting System (ACRS). Crash data are based on 5-year averages for the years 2009–2013. Citation/motor vehicle violation data sourced from the Maryland District Court through the National Study Center for Trauma and EMS (University of Maryland, Baltimore), and are 3-year averages (2011–2013). All data are subject to change.